Feature: Poorest but deserving studes complete TESDA scholarship program, immediate employment await


They had nothing to spend for a college degree course, but they knew they had the ability to learn just like other boys and girls their age, if only a blessing can drop from heaven.

That was the common lamentation two years ago of some 15-male young adults and three-females who thought they had no more chance to enrich themselves and  become productive citizens.

But that was before they heard of the scholarship program from the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) in Region 8 which allowed them to get free education and skills training. 

Financed  by Japan Isuzu Motors Limited (IML) through World Vision Ministry, the scholarship grants more or less P220,000.00 annually for each of the scholars’ foods, books, training equipment and maintenance of TESDA’s Dormitory where they are housed.

TESDA Eastern Samar head Engineer Rico Banario said these graduates are fortunate to have been able to avail of the scholarship, because employability is placed at 100 percent.

The 17-TESDA full scholars during their graduation rites, August 20. They are poor but deserving students whose status in life were validated by TESDA officials in a series of home visits. 

 

“This is a good program for  poor but deserving youths and their parents are fortunate too, because they did not spend any  penny for their child’s college education and getting a job is guaranteed immediately as soon as they reach home from the graduation ceremony as they will be deployed in different Isuzu outlets in the country,” Banario said.

“The screening was stringent, the discipline and  training rigorous and challenging  that I almost gave up,” said class valedictorian Joseph Delmo.

“But I realized, those were all tests on how best we can be in actual work or employment, and if we will be employed abroad, we are confident the county will be proud of us just like the others who are out of the country for work,” Delmo added who admitted some offers for local employment had reached him or his family.

What is most important now, he said with a smile in his face, is that, he can already help his family who is undeniably poor.

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“My parents were surprised why they had been visited for a couple of times by TESDA officials, for they did not have in mind that my declaration in my application being poor will bring them doubt,”  Delmo said.

Quickly, he also assured that the home visits were part of the process, as Engr. Banario said the same in an earlier eavesdrop  before the ceremony.

Nestor Badillo, 52 and his wife took the four-hour land trip from Borongan, Eastern Samar to attend one most important days of his son’s life – his college graduation.  Being an ordinary farmer who tills a rented  farmland in barangay San Jose,  Nestor admitted he could have not offered his son a college diploma, but “thanks to TESDA,” he said with misty-eyes in a brief interview after the ceremony.

“I am just proud of my son, I don’t know where he got his talent, I know he is different and talented,” Nestor added who revealed in the middle of the interview that he was a former student of his interviewer.

He also informed that his son ranked 8th  in the list of graduates, and they are assured one  thing more of his employability. 

“Of his two-years stay in Tacloban, maybe he visited us home, twice or thrice only as he did not want to miss a single lecture and training session,” Nestor recalled.

The son was not reached for an interview, as he was busy with his batchmates doing selfie together with some Japanese Isuzu Chief Executives who flew in to the City to join the great day of the 18-scholar-graduates.

TESDA-8 has been helping indigent but deserving students for the past 10 years and the program is on-going.  It is most thankful for the donors and philanthropists, particularly Japan’s Mr. and Mrs. Yoshinori Ida, Senior Counselor of IML. (LDL/AEN/PIA-8)

Source: PIA Feed